Yestember: say yes!

Friday, September 1, 2017 4:00 pm

Amanda Viviers | 98five blogger

Can you remember the first time you realised that maybe you weren’t that good at something?

I think the older we get, the more tentative we become, aware of our failures, aware of our imperfections and moments where we just get stuck. Our relationships are the first to be affected when we are worried about what other people think.

Very quickly, we start to question and doubt our abilities. We start to shut down. Without even realising it, we have backed ourselves into a corner and played the movie forward and so often we just end up saying no.

As children, we change from these young girls, who dance freely around the kitchen whenever music is played, to women who are uncomfortable that we may look silly or childish or, even worse, fat.

As young girls, we play up to the camera, wanting someone, anyone to take our photo. We smile and we play, then one day we become shy and worried about whether we are good looking enough? Is what we are wearing OK? What will others think of us?

As young women, we cook with delight, making awful breakfasts for our mums in bed, with burnt toast and cold coffee, all the while being so proud. As we grow older we become afraid of inviting guests over for dinner, because our food isn’t up to a master-chef standard.

We draw and scribble outside of the lines as a toddler and preschooler. Then we hear negative words, one after another; that we shouldn’t paint the sky purple, that girls must like butterflies and boys trucks, and our self-worth, year after year, becomes squashed into a place of perfection.

The little girl who decorates her room with scarves and colours, dressing up her Barbie dolls with bright colours, building teepees and forts out of rugs…becomes afraid to invite anyone over to her house because it might not look like those amazing homes on Instagram or Pinterest.

We start to say no to new opportunities out of fear and we progressively shut down our lives until we’re in a place of comfort. I believe there are times in our life we just need to make a crazy change and begin to do things we have never done before. Old ways won’t open new doors. Sometimes you just need to throw caution to the wind and say yes.

That’s what this book is designed to provoke by using the thread called Yestember: saying yes to things we would not normally do.

Stretching our comfort zones, meeting new people.

Seeing your life with new eyes.

For I am about to do something new. See, I have already begun! Do you not see it? I will make a pathway through the wilderness. I will create rivers in the dry wasteland. Isaiah 43:19

So here is what I am asking you to do. Set aside September as an opportunity to say yes. Follow each day’s challenge at amandaviviers.com or look out for each day’s dare on all my social pages (see bio links).

If you want to get ahead and find a list of all of them before you commit (smile), they can be found in my latest book Dear Single Self (paperback, e-book).

Let me know if you are joining us, so we can encourage one another.

This article was originally posted on amandaviviers.com as Yestember 2017


Amanda ViviersAmanda is a writer, speaker, creative coach, wife of Charl and novice Mum to Maximus and Liberty. She’s published three books and can be found in her beach shack, writing her fourth. Her daily blog is a Christian Media & Arts Australia best digital media project award winner. Amanda is a presenter on radio across New Zealand and Australia and is the co-founder of Kin Women; a network created to inspire women. Along with her husband, she is co-owner of surf brand, Maximus and Liberty. They manufacture surfboards, stand up paddle-boards and merchandise to fund youth surfing projects globally. Driven by a passion for social justice, Amanda loves supporting projects for children in developing countries. Teaching children to live creative lives, beyond the circumstances, is something she pursues daily. www.amandaviviers.com | Follow Amanda on Facebook | Instagram | Twitter | Pinterest


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