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Every Wednesday Mel & Jeziel catch up on the last week and share something they’ve learned in the last 7 days for Show and Tell. Whether it be a mind-blowing moment or a small ah-uhhh moment, they bring it to the family to share what they’ve learnt.

 

 

This week Mel discovered the original tiny houses!

Have you ever heard of ‘the tiny house’? As environmental and financial concerns rise in society, a ‘new trend’ has been born; tiny houses made from shipping containers! But is this really a new idea?

This week Mel has discovered that these are not the first man-made tiny houses!

Late in the 19th century, the U.S west coast was going through lumber booms. As the businesses men made their money through timber, they left in their wake seas of beheaded trees. Now, in the west, these aren’t just trees. These are big trees. “Ancient sequoias,” or “Mammoths,” were their nicknames. So the pioneers moved into these lands and upcycled these giant tree stumps into homes!

tiny houses

Images via: Sierra College

It would take workers about a month to bring down a 1,000-year-old sequoia tree.  Then when they fell, the stumps could be used for housing … or a dance floor!

Jeziel discovered an exclusive hiking destination

the wave arizona

Does this photo look familiar? It probably does if you have a Windows computer in 2009, as this was one of the optional wallpapers. But this isn’t any old wallpaper, this pictured out-ed a local Arizona secret that hikers all over the world now want in on!

To hike The Wave in Paria Canyon, Arizona you must obtain a permit. Sounds easy enough right? Not a huge deal? Well, only 20 people per day are allowed to hike the wave and to get a ticket you have to win the lottery!

There are two ways to can go in the draw to obtain a permit:

Enter the lottery 4 months in advance

For a $5 fee, you can apply online for entrance. This must be done 4 months prior to the date you wish to visit. The month after this, 10 names at random are drawn and they are the lucky hikers!

Or you can enter the lottery the day before, in person

If you’re feeling lucky, you can try to get your pass the day before. You just have to be in Arizona, at the visitor’s centre at 8 am the day before you’d like to hike. Between 8.30am and 9.30am a park ranger will assign each party a number and then draw names at random.

This is all in an effort to keep the park as pristine as possible for as long as possible. Are you travelling to Arizona in 4 months? Feeling particularly lucky? Have a go at getting a permit here.

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